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Denmark Still Refusing To Let Gay Couples Marry

When it comes to gay rights Denmark was recognized as a pioneer when legalized gay partnerships in 1989, but after all this time the country has not yet made gay marriage legal.

The Copenhagen Post Online reports:

While jubilant gay and lesbian couples said “I do” by the hundreds in New York last Sunday when it became the sixth and largest US state to legalise same-sex marriage, politicians in Denmark are still saying ‘maybe’ to that milestone of gay and lesbian rights.

Some activists wonder why Denmark – once the leader for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) rights – still will not commit to same-sex marriage, when ten other countries, including our Scandinavian neighbours Sweden and Norway, have already done so.

In 1989 Denmark was the first country in the world to legalise ‘registered partnerships’ for same-sex couples. Registered partnership gave same-sex couples the same legal rights as married heterosexuals. But 22 years later, gays and lesbians in Denmark still do not have the right to marriage or to calling themselves ‘married’.

“Parliament has decided again and again to vote against full marriage rights for all people,” William Agee, spokesperson for PANGEA, the expat network for LGBT Danmark, told The Copenhagen Post. “It highlights for me how far Denmark has fallen from being the vanguard of equality.”

Read the full article via THE COPENHAGEN POST ONLINE

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